Rural accounting software goes fully cloud-based

Rural accounting software goes fully cloud-based

Everyone’s heard of Xero, but a little-known Masterton-based software company has been steadily hoovering up rural customers with its tailored accounting application.

CRS Software has just launched Cash Manager Focus, a new cloud-based product that is now available to its 12,000-strong client base.

The software was developed by a team of 28 developers based at the Masterton CRS office, and has enjoyed a trouble-free first month.

Then Prime minister John Key officially opens CRS's new offices in Masterton in 2014. Also pictured from left Brian Eccles (managing director) and directors Philip Meyer and John Sexton.
PETE NIKOLAISON
Then Prime minister John Key officially opens CRS’s new offices in Masterton in 2014. Also pictured from left Brian Eccles (managing director) and directors Philip Meyer and John Sexton.

CRS director Brian Eccles said he was excited by the product launch.

It took two years of development, during which the software was redesigned from the ground up.
“We are delighted with the new product, positive feedback we have received from customers and the fact that it is stable. It’s a testament to the skilled team that put it together,” he said.

This is the fourth rebuild of the software since it was first developed in the early 1990s.

What set Cash Manager Focus apart was its focus on farmers’ needs.

“Generic products don’t do that at all well,” he said.

The software pays particular focus to farm inputs such as livestock and cost of supplies and cuts out complexities such as job quotes and monitoring debtors.

“We meet the needs of farmers which are surprisingly different to what other small businesses have.”

The seasonal nature of farming meant financials could fluctuate according to markets and the CRS software kept banks in the loop with what was happening with the farm accounts.

Eccles said the company continued to see growth in the New Zealand market and would be looking to explore overseas markets.

Masterton was the perfect place to base their business with its situation as a rural hub town.

Many of his employees were familiar with farms, which also helped with their customer service.

Attracting skilled staff such as software developers had been helped by the fact that they could live in Wairarapa without having to commute to the city.

The company did have some staff in Wellington and maintained a small office there.

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